Happiness is Grateful

I recently read an article in Forbes from 2014 about gratitude. (Find article HERE) What are you grateful for today?

For gratitude, you don’t necessarily have to be grateful to any specific being. I prefer to thank God for the things I have because that is who I believe has the ultimate authority to give and take away. You may be grateful to the specific people involved, a different diety, the universe itself, or even grateful to your past self for setting you up to have these opportunities.

It’s hard to grasp gratitude some days. Especially in our house, there are weeks that are really hard to find something to be grateful for. We’ve spent hours at doctors trying to find a way to cope with life, more hours working on a home that seems to fall apart regularly, are on a first name basis with cops because we see them so often, and even more hours trying to right our upside down money situation. Life can seem dismal.

At the same time, there are always great things to be grateful for. Here are some of mine lately:

I am grateful for a car that is fairly reliable to get me to work and back.

I am grateful for a place to park our home.

I am grateful for people who love me.

I am grateful my husband put down the monkey wrench.

I am grateful my husband and stepson work very hard to regularly take their psych meds.

I am grateful for in-laws who are always willing to help.

I am grateful the police officers are understanding and factual.

I am grateful that my co-workers are constantly cracking jokes. It gets me through my days.

I am grateful for a supervisor that can just look at me and know that something is very off in my life. I’m grateful he’s willing to listen.

I am grateful for a job at a company that pays me well and cares even more about me as a whole person.

I am grateful for loved ones who listen, empathize, and move on to other topics without trying to fix it.

I am grateful for endless shrimp dinners.

I am grateful for food, clean water, heat, and clothing.

So, again I ask, what are you grateful for today?

I’m looking forward to hearing your answers. We’ll see you on the road.

A Head Full of Pain

On the Wednesday after Labor Day, I got up and got ready for work. Jeremy had already left to workout, so I had a fairly silent preparation. I thought my foggy head was just from it being 5am and the remnants of a bad headache I had had the day before. As I walked out the door to get to the car, I was reminded that sometimes headaches don’t just go away; they erupt.

I sat down in a lawn chair we have just outside the doors and the world spun. My headache had morphed into a migraine. Now, I don’t get migraines extremely often, but when I do, they are not usually put at bay by a mere Excedrin Migraine, which I did take immediately hoping that it would put me back on my feet. I ended up having my hopes dashed an hour later and informing my employer that I would not be going to work that day. I then crawled back into bed and slept for most of the rest of the day.

Knowing what a migraine feels like often gives me a small bit of insight into how Jeremy and others with bipolar and borderline personality disorders must feel sometimes. I’m lucky; migraines and severe headaches are accepted illnesses and I can at least get some sympathy from people.

There’s always someone that doesn’t get it, though. Where they get “We all feel sad sometimes” or “I have a hard time relating to people sometimes too”, people with migraines hear “Yeah, I get headaches all the time.” Note: Bipolar Depression  and Borderline Personality Disorder are not the same as sadness, just as headaches are not the same as migraines.

Let me show you a physical example: You have been reading my blog. I assume that most of you are reading with a fair amount of ease, maybe with glasses, but for the most part, it’s comprehensible. Now, look at this: 785a97667c645119a46dc4911af7088f--migraines-quotes-chronic-migraine-quotes

Do you see the difference now? And this examples is if the migraine is a minor one. When mine are severe, the center of my vision is entirely fogged out.

Years ago, I found a video that helped me understand a little bit of what Jeremy goes through. When I showed him the video, he told me that it was the closest he’d seen to capturing how he feels and it’s still a tad off the mark. Check it out here: What it Feels like to Have Borderline Personality Disorder.

I didn’t really get it until I watched this. Then, I went on a YouTube binge to try to understand, to try to find treatments that might help, and to reach out to those that I finally felt that I might understand a little better. I got it now that his outbursts, mood swings, and self-deprecation were just an outward expression of his head full of pain. My outward expression was sleeping, dimming the lights, and putting on my fuzzy sweatshirt. On days when his illness was taking hold, he became sullen, lost control of his voice inflection, and was unable to sit for more than 5 minutes. When mine is bad, I can’t get out of bed, cry a lot, and ask him to put on headphones instead of sharing his videos.

Either way, invisible illnesses are harder than they look. Those of  us that have them often fill ourselves with pills to be able to make it through a day at work (as I am doing today, since the remnants of my reasons for staying home are sticking around today). We may take longer breaks than others. We may need more praise and motivation speeches. We don’t want pity and we might just want you to listen for a little bit when we’re tired of explaining that our bodies and brains are rebelling against our intentions. Thank you to those that try. Thank you for reading this post, whether you’re struggling with it or it comes easy to you. I know better than many how hard reading can be some days. Health and happiness to you all; we’ll see you on the road.